Your contact partners
in this area:
Prof. <br /> Dr. med. habil.<br /> Georg Matziolis
Prof.
Dr. med. habil.
Georg Matziolis

Senior Consultant of the Clinic for Orthopaedics and Accident Surgery

Acting holder of the Chair for Orthopaedics of the FSU Jena at the Waldkrankenhaus Eisenberg

Telephone:
036691 8-1002


Specialist Registrar Dr. med. Steffen Brodt
Specialist Registrar Dr. med. Steffen Brodt

Head of department hip

Specialist for Orthopaedics and Accident Surgery, Special Orthopaedic Surgery

Coxarthrosis

Hip joint arthrosis

Coxarthrosis  (hip joint arthrosis) is one of the most common forms of arthrosis: As the hip is subjected to loads when standing and walking which correspond to many times the body weight, wear symptoms also occur more frequently here than on the joints of the upper extremities (shoulders, elbows).

Wear usually begins in the upper part of the joint and gradually spreads over the whole surface of the joints: This leads to progressive destruction of the cartilage surface of the acetabular socket and femoral head – finally bones move on bones. Patients suffering from coxarthrosis usually complain of "run-in pain" and stress pain in the hip joint, which increase throughout the day and may also spread to the knee joint.

In the course of the illness, the intensity of the complaints increases over the months and years, and restrictions of movement and limping to relieve the load may result. At an early stage, we can treat the coxarthrosis with medicines and specific physiotherapeutic measures.

In childhood and early adulthood, in the case of acquired malposition, we carry out osteotomies (repositioning operation, pelvic osteotomy) to prevent or delay imminent hip joint wear  – younger patients in particular benefit from this method of preserving joints.

In the case of a pronounced hip joint arthrosis, the insertion of an artificial hip joint is often the only remaining, but promising means of relieving the patients' pain and helping them to lead an active life. Depending on requirements and stage of the illness, various types of hip endoprosthetics are available to us (surface replacement, short shaft prosthetic, standard prosthetic, special prosthetic for prosthetic replacement, tumour prosthetics, with cemented or cementless anchoring technology).


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X-ray image of a one-sided coxarthrosis (on the left in the image) with narrowing of the joint gap and cysts in the femoral head, on the opposite hip (on the right in the image) joint gap still very visible.

X-ray image of a one-sided coxarthrosis (on the left in the image) with narrowing of the joint gap and cysts in the femoral head, on the opposite hip (on the right in the image) joint gap still very visible.

X-ray image of a joint-preserving pelvic and femoral osteotomy.

X-ray image of a joint-preserving pelvic and femoral osteotomy.

X-ray image of a short shaft endoprosthetic.

X-ray image of a short shaft endoprosthetic.