Your contact partners
in this area:
Prof. <br /> Dr. med. habil.<br /> Georg Matziolis
Prof.
Dr. med. habil.
Georg Matziolis

Senior Consultant of the Clinic for Orthopaedics and Accident Surgery

Acting holder of the Chair for Orthopaedics of the FSU Jena at the Waldkrankenhaus Eisenberg

Telephone:
036691 8-1002


Osteonecrosis

In the same way as necrosis of the femoral head on the hip joint, with osteonecrosis of the knee joint a locally limited necrosis of bone tissue occurs below the joint cartilage – the necrosis centre is cut off from the blood supply.

The localised necrosis occurs on the knee joint during youth (osteochondrosis dissecans) or in adulthood as segmental necrosis of the femur (necrosis of the femural condyle).

If the necrosis centre is pushed into the joint, free joint elements occur which may cause painful trapping when the knee joint is moved. Defects on the joint area lead to pain and swelling, and in the further course and without treatment, a gonarthrosis also occurs here in adulthood.

Depending on the degree of joint damage, doctors recommend methods to maintain the joint such as drilling and refixing of the detached bone fragment, or cartilage or bone transplants. In adulthood and at a late stage, the insertion of an artificial knee joint must be considered.

This may interest you:
Autologous cartilage transplantation
Orthopaedics: Sports injuries and shoulder disorders

In particular, sports accidents and some special disorders (osteochondrosis dissecans) lead to cartilage loss on the knee joint or ankle joint. If it goes untreated, cartilage damage may lead in many cases to the formation of premature joint wear (arthrosis).

More information.


At an early stage, osteonecrosis can be successfully treated with operations to maintain the joint.

At an early stage, osteonecrosis can be successfully treated with operations to maintain the joint.